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A Little Foalish Havoc...

A Little Foalish Havoc...

" For many years I was involved with animals in many aspects. "
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Vet tech, dog trainer, showing dogs, horse showing, breeding horses, etc. I have long both been an ardent animal lover and have had a special connection with them. I became the person that all of my animal loving friends called for advice when they had an animal problem, be it their own or a wild critter they happened across.

So, it was not surprising one spring day, during foaling season, when a friend of mine, a fellow horse breeder, called me and asked me to come over to assess a problem.

I arrive and she starts explaining the problem to me as we are walking towards the barn. She had a mare who had lost a foal at birth, due to what is termed a "red bag" delivery, a few days previous. This mare was now acting so nervous and anxious, restless in her stall and yelling her head off randomly. She had every horse in the barn on edge.

The minute we stepped into the barn, I knew what the problem was.....

There, wandering about, having himself a fine time, was the spirit of a foal. The problem was that while mom was constrained by the barriers of the stall walls, Little Man had no such impediments. He was wandering, trotting, running wherever he pleased. Mom, still full of post partum hormones, causing her brain to be engaged in full blown "Momma Mode", was absolutely flipping out because here was Little Man running off to places she couldn't get to in order to protect him. This had her stuck in an anxiety state.

Between mom flipping out and Little Man randomly roaming through their stalls and running about uncontrolled, the other horses in the barn were understandably up in arms as well. The whole barn was in a state of high anxiety. Not good....

It took me a few minutes to explain what was going on and try to convince my friend that I wasn't crazy. We finally settled on, crazy or not, I wasn't going to suggest she do anything to the mare that was going to hurt her so she might as well try it as it just might help.

The first order of business was to get the mare out of anxiety mode so that she could get unstuck from her mothering mode, move past it and get herself and Little Man ready for him to move on. This meant we had to figure out how to "break down the barriers" between them, so to speak, so that he wasn't getting off into places where she couldn't get to him. This would allow her to decompress, de-stress, making it possible for her to process the fact that he was, in fact, a spirit and she needed to let him go and help him move on.

This is where animals are more tricky than people. I have found that when it comes to helping animals move on, their own kind is usually the best ones to assist them with that. The most that we humans have to do at times is to facilitate the conditions that make it possible. In this case, it was getting mom back into her right mind. So long as she was in a state of high anxiety, she would remain stuck in "I have to protect and care for my baby" mode and unable to move past it.

To that end, I advised my friend to move the mare to a large paddock. Foals explore and discover the world in a growing outward spiral with mom at the center. Putting the mare in a large turnout would give Little Man room to run while decreasing the likelihood of him putting a barrier between he and his dam. This, in turn, would help decrease her anxiety so that she could move on to processing the situation. Once that happened, she could get herself ready to let him go and get him ready to move on. I advised her to just leave the mare in the turnout 24/7 until I checked back in a few days to see where things stood.

I returned 8 days later to find the mare calmly grazing and Little Man nowhere in sight. My friend stated that, much as I predicted, the mare had shed her anxiety over the course of approximately the first 3 days of being turned out and fully returned to normal over the course of the days following that. Fortunately, animals seem to be far more pragmatic and rational about the spiritual state, so once she was able to move past her mothering mode anxiety, she was able to get on with what needed to be done.

I have to say that Little Man was definitely my cutest spirit I ever dealt with, even if he was causing some chaos initially. I wish he could have stuck around among the living as he was as beautifully marked as his sire and quite fearless and charming. He came right up to me when we walked into the barn, with a "And you are??" attitude, even with his dam stuck in a stall at the far end of the barn. He would have been a challenge, but just the kind of horse I love to have in the end.


WyspersInTheDark
Vet tech, dog trainer, showing dogs, horse showing, breeding horses, etc. I have long both been an ardent animal lover and have had a special connection with them. I became the person that all of my animal loving friends called for advice when they had an animal problem, be it their own or a wild critter they happened across.

So, it was not surprising one spring day, during foaling season, when a friend of mine, a fellow horse breeder, called me and asked me to come over to assess a problem.

I arrive and she starts explaining the problem to me as we are walking towards the barn. She had a mare who had lost a foal at birth, due to what is termed a "red bag" delivery, a few days previous. This mare was now acting so nervous and anxious, restless in her stall and yelling her head off randomly. She had every horse in the barn on edge.

The minute we stepped into the barn, I knew what the problem was.....

There, wandering about, having himself a fine time, was the spirit of a foal. The problem was that while mom was constrained by the barriers of the stall walls, Little Man had no such impediments. He was wandering, trotting, running wherever he pleased. Mom, still full of post partum hormones, causing her brain to be engaged in full blown "Momma Mode", was absolutely flipping out because here was Little Man running off to places she couldn't get to in order to protect him. This had her stuck in an anxiety state.

Between mom flipping out and Little Man randomly roaming through their stalls and running about uncontrolled, the other horses in the barn were understandably up in arms as well. The whole barn was in a state of high anxiety. Not good....

It took me a few minutes to explain what was going on and try to convince my friend that I wasn't crazy. We finally settled on, crazy or not, I wasn't going to suggest she do anything to the mare that was going to hurt her so she might as well try it as it just might help.

The first order of business was to get the mare out of anxiety mode so that she could get unstuck from her mothering mode, move past it and get herself and Little Man ready for him to move on. This meant we had to figure out how to "break down the barriers" between them, so to speak, so that he wasn't getting off into places where she couldn't get to him. This would allow her to decompress, de-stress, making it possible for her to process the fact that he was, in fact, a spirit and she needed to let him go and help him move on.

This is where animals are more tricky than people. I have found that when it comes to helping animals move on, their own kind is usually the best ones to assist them with that. The most that we humans have to do at times is to facilitate the conditions that make it possible. In this case, it was getting mom back into her right mind. So long as she was in a state of high anxiety, she would remain stuck in "I have to protect and care for my baby" mode and unable to move past it.

To that end, I advised my friend to move the mare to a large paddock. Foals explore and discover the world in a growing outward spiral with mom at the center. Putting the mare in a large turnout would give Little Man room to run while decreasing the likelihood of him putting a barrier between he and his dam. This, in turn, would help decrease her anxiety so that she could move on to processing the situation. Once that happened, she could get herself ready to let him go and get him ready to move on. I advised her to just leave the mare in the turnout 24/7 until I checked back in a few days to see where things stood.

I returned 8 days later to find the mare calmly grazing and Little Man nowhere in sight. My friend stated that, much as I predicted, the mare had shed her anxiety over the course of approximately the first 3 days of being turned out and fully returned to normal over the course of the days following that. Fortunately, animals seem to be far more pragmatic and rational about the spiritual state, so once she was able to move past her mothering mode anxiety, she was able to get on with what needed to be done.

I have to say that Little Man was definitely my cutest spirit I ever dealt with, even if he was causing some chaos initially. I wish he could have stuck around among the living as he was as beautifully marked as his sire and quite fearless and charming. He came right up to me when we walked into the barn, with a "And you are??" attitude, even with his dam stuck in a stall at the far end of the barn. He would have been a challenge, but just the kind of horse I love to have in the end.


WyspersInTheDark

© WyspersInTheDark - 07-21-18



1 Comment
A comment by Peanut_Boy
What an eye-opening experience! I must say, I hope more people get a chance to read this, it is such a great and heartwarming paranormal encounter, thanks for sharing!
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Added 07-21-18

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